Guardians of the Galaxy

Marvel Comics is on a roll. Guardians of the Galaxy opened with a stunning $94 million dollar weekend, breaking the previous Guardians-of-the-Galaxy2August record for a movie opening. In spite of bewilderment within the entertainment industry leading up to its release (there was in interesting discussion about this on Rotten Tomatoes’ podcast), critics and audiences have been giving it well-deserved reviews.

It’s funny, surprisingly moving at time, and loaded with great special effects. It’s not perfect (it’s got some crude language, and the scope and severity of the violence was minimized and at times too light-hearted), but as far as summer blockbusters go, it’s very good. I was certainly entertained. I was equally challenged by a thought-provoking scene near the end of the movie.

When Peter Quill, aka Starlord, realizes that he finally has a chance to stop running from hardship and do something truly noble, he tells the other soon-to-be guardians of the galaxy what he has in mind. Rocket soberly summarizes what is painfully clear to all of them: “You’re asking us to die.” [Read more...]

It’s Evidential

A review of Discovering Intelligent Design: A Journey into the Scientific Evidence
by Gary Kemper, Hallie Kemper, and Casey Luskin

DiscoveringIDCoverGraphic (4)When Hallie Kemper, a homeschool educator and science teacher, set out to locate a curriculum for intelligent design (ID), she couldn’t find one that met her needs. So she and her husband Gary, a former aerospace scientist and ID skeptic who had become a supporter after discovering academic and media misinformation on the subject, wrote one. Then they teamed up with Casey Luskin, cofounder of the Intelligent Design and Evolution Awareness (IDEA) Center, to produce Discovering Intelligent Design: A Journey into the Scientific Evidence (“DID”) to fill the void in the curriculum market.  [Read more...]

Youth, Popularity, and Apologetics

Students Love Answers More Than the Church Loves AnswersI was listening to J. Warner Wallace’s podcast recently, and it’s one I encourage all of you to listen to. He talked about presenting talks on apologetics and how youth get enthused about it. I started pondering then why that might be, and I’d like to share a suspicion I have on the matter.

I have written much on how the ancient world was an honor/shame culture where we’re a more individualistic one, but that does not mean that we are totally devoid of any idea of shame. Social status is everything to many a teenager. This is why so many of them buy clothes they might not care for and get into fads that they wouldn’t care for otherwise. They want to fit in with their peers and not be embarrassed. [Read more...]

Book Review: The Intolerance of Tolerance

downloadThe Intolerance of Tolerance by D.A. Carson is a masterful exploration into one of the greatest cultural issues of our day—tolerance by one of the greatest Christian minds of our day. In post-modernism, tolerance—the affirming and celebrating of virtually any exercise of personal autonomy – is the prime value. The unforgiveable sin is being judgmental, that is, believing that an activity or lifestyle choice that does not hurt another person is wrong, immoral, or sinful. A second related unforgiveable sin is claiming that what you believe is objectively true and thus binding on another person. A person who holds these beliefs is considered to be bigoted, narrow-minded, and arrogant, just as was true in Ancient Rome. [Read more...]

Initial Thoughts: Copan & Litwak’s “The Gospel in the Marketplace of Ideas”

UnknownThe CAA is participating in Apologetics 315′s weekly Read Along program. We are reading “The Gospel in the Marketplace of Ideas: Paul’s Mars Hill Experience for Our Pluralistic World” by Paul Copan and Kenneth D. Litwak.

See the first announcement on the CAA Facebook page.

These are my initial thoughts:

This “context” topic has come up recently in my own circle of apologetics buddies, in terms of the tension between speaking German (“Christianese”) to someone who speaks Chinese on one extreme, and whispering sweet nothings to tickle the ears of the seeker on the other extreme.

We need to communicate the Gospel in a meaningful way without:

  • coming across as a resounding gong or clanging cymbal, or
  • watering it down

How do we do that?

This book zeroes in on Paul’s Mars Hill address in Athens, recorded in Acts–and I’m predicting that I’ve read something similar in Don Richardson’s “Eternity in their Hearts”–but Richardson covered many different cultures. I’m looking forward to a more in-depth treatment.

[Read more...]